In the Works and in the World

I’m working on two really exciting projects at the moment! One is an absolutely stellar Young Adult novel with amazing potential to join the canon of classics. VERY close to publication, and I can’t wait to tell you more about it!

The other is a New Adult novel that puts an interesting (and much-needed) twist on the genre. It’s in its early stages and will make for some fun and seductive summer reading in 2017 if all goes as planned.

I had the good fortune to visit Cuba earlier this year and was dazzled by the vivacious, friendly people; the beautiful scenery; and the social and historic restoration projects under way. Below are a few photos … I hope you enjoy:

 

Detail-Old Havana

Architectural detail: Old Havana

Havana Market

Havana market vendor

egg seller

Egg vendor

At the Bodega

At a bodega

Artist Discussing and Showing His Work

Havana artist explaining his magnificent work

cuban street

Havana side street

Master Cigar Maker at Work

Master cigar maker at work

Heart of Havana

Central Havana

Now Available: Black Orchid Night!

Black Orchid Night Cover

H.T. Manogue’s latest novel, Black Orchid Night, is now available! Don’t miss this intriguing narrative of one woman’s quest to link the people in her life to the very familiar — yet very different — people who appear in her active and vivid dream world!

For more information, click here: Black Orchid Night by H.T. Manogue

Fun! Hot! Video Trailer for “Legal Briefs,” N.M. Silber’s New Amazon Best Seller!

You can’t watch it without smiling!

 

 

Shop ‘Til You Never Drop

Penis Renuzit           Years ago, I worked in a department store. Bed and bath department. A doorway opened to the parking lot. An archway linked us to the men’s department. One day, my co-workers and I heard a frantic kerfuffle in the men’s department. “What’s going on over there?” we tittered among ourselves, straining our necks, forbidden to leave Bed & Bath before our breaks.

Minutes later, an ambulance crew burst through the door with a gurney and oxygen and medical supplies, flying toward the men’s department.

Before long, the same crew ambled back through our department, wheeling a covered body out the parking lot door.

“What happened?” I asked a colleague from the men’s department who was standing agog in the archway.

“A lady just dropped dead on our floor,” he said, stunned. “She was shopping with her family. She … just collapsed. When the paramedics arrived, she was dead.”

HOLY CRAP!

“You won’t believe what happened at work today!” I told my mom that night on the phone. “A lady dropped dead shopping in the men’s department!”

“Really? Wow! That’s exactly how I want to go!” she quipped. “I want to shop ‘til I drop!”

I gasped.

“Mom, I’m not kidding! This lady collapsed on the floor of the men’s department and died! She was shopping with her family! It’s not funny!”

“Oh, I’m serious,” Mom replied. “I think that’s a great way to go. Enjoy life with your family right up to the last minute. I can’t think of a better way to die!”

Then I realized … yeah, she was serious.

If there was an intergalactic shopping championship of the universe, my mom would nail it in seconds flat.

She wasn’t a shopaholic in the sense of “Must have! Must buy! Must overspend!” Shopping was just a hobby and a joy to her, and she was damn good at it. She could smell a bargain at 10,000 paces, but she didn’t need money to shop. She was happy just to browse and try on and oooh and ahhh – even to window shop.

Once, she bought a case of Renuzit air freshener from Big Lots for 10 cents a can. Some wiseguy packaging designer arranged a penis among the flowers on the can, and she overheard the Big Lots staff giggling about it as they pulled the cans off the shelves.

She persuaded them to sell her 24 cans. Then she gleefully gave cans of “Penis Renuzit” to her nearest and dearest friends and family.

She really did want to shop ‘til she dropped, surrounded by the people she loved.

Only half her wish came true. Leukemia got her before the mall did. Today is her birthday, and it would have been a big one – ya know, one of those major benchmark ages that ends with a five or a zero.

I went to visit her in a place far more bucolic than I’m sure she’d secretly choose for her final resting place. I think she’d rather spend eternity in a place surrounded by art or fashion or children.

But I have to believe that she’s busy celebrating in that big Skymall, with our beloved long-gone pets devotedly tailing her as she tries on St. John knits “just to see how they fit”  and honing her radar in on great deals to share with family, friends and charities. I think her birthday party is at a place where she can shop and shop and never drop.

Happy birthday, Mom. ☮

How to Maximize a Book Festival Appearance: 9 Tips

bookfestivalphoto

Don’t sit. Bring posters of your book cover. Stand your books upright. Draw a crowd. And more! Great tips for maximizing your promotional impact and sales at book festivals.

How to Maximize a Book Festival Appearance: 9 Tips.

What This Guy Says … Uh, YES!

Little things matter photo

Terrific, funny, heart-filled post about first drafts, the insecurities and strange obsessions of good writers and editors regarding pride in their work, our universal anxiety about proofreading snafus, and the joy of well-edited work. Check it out by clicking the link below!

Clean Copy.

Some Personal Lessons From “Probabililty Chain”

Probability Chain Pt1 photo        When Regan Keeter offered me a review copy of Part 1 of his novel “Probability Chain,” I did what I usually do when I’m offered an ARC: I accepted. (I rarely turn down free books unless I know there’s no chance I’ll read them.)

I recently wrote about cliffhangers and how indie lit readers seem to have an angry mob mentality about them as a literary device, despite irrefutable evidence of cliffhangers’ recurrent success in pop culture and classics – and in multiple media: TV, film, books, video games, et al. And I expressed fear that great indie writers, their work, and our collective ability to nurture future generations of critical thinkers are threatened by the current mob-minded trendiness of attacking cliffhanger-based books.

I was especially eager to read “Probability Chain” because I was so intrigued with Keeter’s risky format for his work. “Probability Chain” is a serial novel. Basically, you buy the novel in pieces. My review copy was eight chapters and 92 pages in hard copy format. Kindle downloads are 99 cents; hard copies are priced a bit higher.

I love the way Keeter’s serial model celebrates the cliffhanger. When I finished Part 1, I was invested and ready to read Part 2 (which isn’t available yet – Part 1 was just released in September). I say, “Great! Leave me hanging!” And I mean it!

In the world of indie lit, we’re all taking chances and experimenting with what works and what doesn’t. I talked to Regan by phone, and he explained that his serial novel approach is an experiment. He’s trying to find the model that works in his own niche of indie lit. I think that’s brave and necessary. We’re all trying to find a silver bullet in this new age of indie publishing. Indie authors are pioneers! Continue reading

25 Independent Presses That Prove This Is the Golden Age of Indie Publishing

Flavorwire

Independent publishing — that is, publishing whatever an individual or small group think is worthy of dumping their time and money into — is nothing new. From Virginia and Leonard Woolf starting up Hogarth Press to the early days of Farrar, Straus and Giroux championing now-iconic authors that other publishers wouldn’t touch, DIY publishing has long been responsible for some of our best literature.

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